British leaders have spoken out about the anti-Semitism fuelled terror attack in Halle, Germany yesterday which saw two people killed and several others injured.

The attack was driven by anti-Semitism, with the terrorist blaming Jews for all the problems of the world. Fortunately, he was unable to enter the synagogue that he was targeted, where around 80 Jewish people were worshipping. Sadly, he killed two Germans, a woman who was walking past the synagogue and a man at a nearby kebab shop. At this time neither of the victims have been named.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson gave a statement saying, “My thoughts are with our friends in Germany and with Jewish communities following yesterday’s sickening attack. To target people in their place of worship on one of the holiest days in the Jewish calendar is despicable.”

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn tweeted: “This is a shocking and disgraceful attack during Yom Kippur, one of the holiest days of the year in the Jewish calendar.”

“My thoughts are with the injured and those mourning, and with Jewish communities in Halle and across the world.”

John Mann, the Government’s new antisemitism tsar, said his “thoughts are with the Jewish Community in this country and especially those who live in Germany.”

“This isn’t an isolated incident and the number of antisemitic murders have grown significantly across Europe over the last three years,” he added.

“Whenever a Jewish person feels unsafe and vulnerable as they make their way to the synagogue or carrying out their daily it’s for us to stand with them and call out the racists, root out the extremists and use all the necessary powers to stop the terrorists.”

Yom Kippur is the holiest day for Jews and appears to be why it was chosen by the attacker. In the UK, and indeed across Europe, there was additional security to keep the Jewish community safe.

Simon Johnson, chief executive of the Jewish Leadership Council, lamented the “tragic loss of life” and extended his gratitude to security organisations such as the Community Security Trust (CST) that “worked so hard today to keep our community safe.”

The CST expressed its “deepest sympathy” to the families, friends and communities “of those murdered and injured in today’s far right terror attack in Halle, Germany, against a synagogue during Yom Kippur service and then a kebab shop.”

“Today’s tragic events in Halle, Germany, further confirm the need for places of worship to have strong doors, reinforced windows and proper security measures. CST will continue working with our UK Jewish community and others, to ensure this is the case,” the CST added.

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