The Dutch Protestant Church made a far-reaching recognition of guilt Sunday for its failure to do more to help Jews during and after World War II, and for the church’s role in preparing ”the ground in which the seeds of anti-Semitism and hatred could grow.”

The long-awaited, historic statement came at a solemn ceremony to mark Monday’s anniversary of the Nazis’ anti-Jewish Kristallnacht pogrom, or the “Night of Broken Glass.”

On November 9, 1938, Jews were terrorized throughout Germany and Austria. At least 91 people were killed, hundreds of synagogues burned down, around 7,500 Jewish businesses vandalized, and up to 30,000 Jewish men arrested, many of whom were taken away to concentration camps.

René de Reuver, speaking on behalf of the General Synod of the Protestant Church in the Netherlands, said the church’s role began long before Adolf Hitler came to power in Germany.

“For centuries, a rift was maintained that could later isolate the Jews in society in such a way that they could be taken away and murdered,” De Reuver said.

“Also in the war years, the ecclesiastical authorities often lacked the courage to choose a position for the Jewish citizens of our country,” he added.

More than 100,000 Dutch Jews — 70% of the Jewish community — did not survive World War II. Most were deported, along with Roma and Sinti, and killed in Nazi concentration camps.

Read the full story at Times of Israel

Related Articles:

Israeli police blow up unexploded Hamas rocket on beach

The Israeli police blew up an unexploded bomb on an Israeli beach in Ashdod this week. The rocket was discovered on Sunday and is believed to have fallen during the recent...

Philadelphia food festival cancelled after backlash for uninviting Israeli food truck

A culinary festival in Philadelphia slated for Sunday was cancelled amid an uproar after it disinvited an Israeli food truck from taking part. The “Taste of Home” festival,...

German media giant tells staff: If you’re anti-Israel, find a new job

The CEO of Europe's largest media company has said that anyone upset about the flying of an Israeli flag outside their Berlin office can find work elsewhere. Axel Springer...

‘Allah Akbar’ graffiti found at Jewish cemetery in France

A Jewish cemetery was targeted by an act of anti-Semitism recently when "Allah Akbar" was daubed on a sign at its entrance. The incident took place in Strasbourg, France...

Germany bans Hamas flags after anti-Semitic incidents

The German government has agreed to ban Hamas flags from being flown in the country following a string of anti-Semitic incidents linked with anti-Israel activism in the...

16 Month Scripture Calendar